Wednesday, December 18

Shared Narrative vs Personal Narrative in Apple Ad and why you should care

I speak on a number of topics, one of them being technology pros and cons for potential Fire Service Candidates through Fire Alumni.
It goes beyond the usual talks about the dangers of the evil social media and gives candidates tools they can use to better use the medium for their benefit.
In the presentation I discuss personal vs shared narrative as a way of addressing their desire to use the medium to communicate.  It's not much use to tell you not to do something if I can't explain WHY it is not a good idea.


Personal narrative is like a first person recollection of an event.
Shared narrative is including others in the event while simultaneously removing oneself from the event in order to do so.


I give 2 examples.


One is where a couple witnesses a romantic sunset and decides to photograph themselves with the sunset behind them. While they did experience the sunset, they also had to interrupt their personal narrative to arrange the photo, in which they are no longer enjoying the very thing they are hoping to share.


The second example is when I finally talked my young daughters into wanting to watch Star Wars.


We got bundled up on the couch, drinks and snacks at the ready and I started the DVD. The Lucas Film logo appeared and I suddenly wanted to share this personal narrative with friends, family and the girls when they got older. I crouched down in front of them and snapped a pic.
However, while I was doing that my eldest said, "Daddy, what do those words say?"


I had missed the opening scroll. Forever. I will never have that moment back.
My desire to share interrupted my experience of the moment.


According to the candidates that approach me following the presentation, this message is well received.


In order to keep errors on social media at bay, focus on personal narrative.


Today this Apple ad was circulating the interwebs machine and I think it perfectly encapsulates the importance of personal narrative.
Have a look:


The kid in the ad is ALWAYS on his phone.  Like I am most days I'll admit, but we assume from most of the ad he is texting or playing a game (Like I likely am, remember, I've fallen victim to the allure of the shared narrative) but we later learn he is making a clever little video.


We see the family becoming emotional at certain parts of the video, not because of what they see, but because of the emotions they associate with the memory of the events being shown.  They are being shown events they took part in.  The kid who made the video did not take part, he filmed them.  Each of the images has him removed from the event in an effort to later share it with the people in the image.  For the family it is a reminder of personal narrative, for the kid it is only shared narrative.


The exact same error I made with my daughters and Star Wars Apple wants us to believe is a good reason to use their products.


I love the idea of collecting and editing video on a handheld device.


I don't love the assumption that ignoring the present to revisit in the future should be our priority.  Our priority should be to live in the now, be with the people we are with and in the place we are in, not to post a clever status or photo to include others, but truly experience life while it happens.  If that later leads to a sharing of events, so be it, but just wait.


 


Imagine the family Christmas celebration this family could have had if the kid on the phone had taken part instead of filming.  We'd have no clever little video, but we would have the same memories and perhaps even more to talk about instead of looking to technology to share every moment at the expense of the moment itself.  Just as powerful to me would have been if the child was constantly reading a book the whole time, then stood and recounted all the fun times he witnessed.  he still would have missed the events themselves while reading.  It's not the phone that is to blame here, it is the desire to share the experience before the experience has been...well...experienced.


 


I tell Fire Service Candidates that social media is not dangerous, it's how you use it that is.  Technology has made it so easy to share anything with anyone at anytime the urge to transfer personal narrative to shared narrative can be difficult to overcome, but the only way to be truly successful and enjoy life is to do just that: Live Now.  Post Later.

Tuesday, December 17

Mixed Signals at Youth Detention - NOMA

I was asked to accompany my supervisor to the local Youth Detention Center where they're running a couple weeks of a modified almost career day program. They're bringing in trades and professions from TV makeup to EMS and showing the kids that they don't have to give up the hopes of moving on with their lives when they get out.

I think it's a great idea since simply putting someone in a room and waving a finger at them seldom produces change in behavior. My 7 year old could have told you that.

We had a presentation prepared about the history of EMS, local and State requirements to achieve licensure and what to expect on the job. We had pros, cons, salary expectations and, most importantly to them, what your background needed to look like.
They were very interested in learning about the sliding scale of background infractions that will still yield a job taking care of people on their worst days. This many years without a conviction in this, that many years without 2 or more convictions in that...they were riveted and you could see them doing the math in their heads. "If I get out this year and don't re-offend I can be an EMT in 4 years!"

The Company Man in me was on board with the message of inspiring these youths to look beyond their transgressions and wipe the slate clean. An opportunity awaits them to possibly get a job with me helping people.
Everyone deserves a second chance in life, especially the young.

Not on my ambulance (NOMA).

That's what the EMS 2.0 inside me said. During the presentation I did my best to explain to the class just how easy it is to get an EMT cert.
"Only 120 hours of class needed guys!"
"2 days a week for 1 semester at the community college and you'll be able to take the test. Pass it and you can apply to work on an ambulance!"

The conflict within me was well hidden I assure you.

While I agree that these kids need this message of how easy it is to get into EMS, I don't want it to be so easy.

Taking care of people takes blind trust on their part assuming that the agency responding has done something to make sure you are a trustworthy person and are trained to take care of them. We extend our message of EMS with the promise of lights and sirens, driving on the wrong side of the road and try to temper that with tales of 911 abuse, vomit, urine, blood and guts. All this group seemed to be interested in was why my stripes were silver and my boss's gold.

They're kids.

We need to take this message to EVERY school and get kids excited about helping people and being selfish about it.

Yes, I said selfish. I don't do this job to help people, I do it because the feeling I get from helping people is addictive and better than anything I know. I help people because if I don't I don't feel right. Trying to convey that message to a group of young men already 2 strikes down and out of their league doesn't translate as well as one may hope.

One of them asked how we handle dealing with sick people and I told them it's easy. It's taking care of the people you shouldn't want to that is hard.

I told the story of the child abuser that was confronted by a neighbor. The child had been transported by another crew and I was called to deal with the abuser and his mild injuries. That man got the exact same high level of assessment, care and transport as my mother would have received. Not because it was the law, or policy or the right thing to do, but that's what I was there for. My sole purpose was to help those who asked and I did it with a smile on my face. Maybe not the biggest smile, but I helped and I felt better.

I wanted to share more about the realities of EMS with those kids but we ran out of time.

We didn't talk about burnout, divorce, poor dietary habits, the sedentary lifestyle of 12 hour system status cars or the fact that in most communities you'll need a second job to make ends meet.

In the end I don't think it will matter.

The Company Man in me will apply whatever standards my employer sets forth when considering candidates, regardless of personal belief or Professional discretion. But if I was the boss, even if you carried the same license and all other things being equal, I'm hiring the kid that WANTS to be here, not one who took the easy road and wants to give it a shot because it took less hours than welding at the local college to get qualified.

Am I wrong? Maybe, but at least then I'll know and can move forward.

What are your thoughts on reaching out to troubled youth about jobs in EMS?

Friday, December 13

Ambulance Response Time Resolution Theater

A Paramedic I work with in CQI and I were having a conversation that was originally aimed at discovering the best way to handle complaints that had no merit.
You know the complaint:
"your paramedics stole $8000 from my wheelchair when they took me in for a swolen toe"
or
"I was almost late for my podiatry appointment..."
We also discussed how to respond when someone mentions a minor issue and follows it up with "I don't want to get anyone fired or anything but..."
Apparently telling them "Oh, no one is getting fired. Not for using the siren on your street when you told the call taker your husband couldn't breathe."
But our conversation yielded a brilliant idea I don't think anyone has tried before:
Ambulance Response Time Resolution Theater.
Here is how it works:
Someone calls in complaining about the time it took to get an ambulance for a minor issue, that they were taken to the wrong ED even though transport was not indicated etc etc. In other words, most of our clients.
When they call in, tell them to come by at 4:30 on Friday for a formal apology. If 4:30 isn't when your cardiac arrest survivor comes in to meet the crew that saved them, then adjust as necessary. Tell the complainant they can sit in if they like but you'll need to address the heart attack first.
They may not connect the dots but it sure will make you feel better.